Discussion of Microtheme Initiation Readings: *Chapter Two in Hero *Part Four and Six in Leeming (be sure to read the commentary at the end of each section

Discussion of Microtheme Initiation Readings: *Chapter Two in Hero *Part Four and Six in Leeming (be sure to read the commentary at the end of each section) *The Commentary at the end of part 5 in Leeming Assignment: Microtheme over readings. What’s Due: Microtheme on “Departure” Introduction: As with last week, pay attention to Campbell’s definition of “initiation” and his discussion of its many subsections. For this week’s microtheme, after you have read Campbell, find examples of his ideas in the material excerpted by Leeming. Explain fully how your specific examples from Leeming illustrate the definitions and concepts you supplied from Campbell. Use QUOTES from both. Joseph Campbell
COMMEMORATIVE
EDITION
THE HERO WITH A
With an Introduction by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, Ph.D.
author of Women Who Run With the Wolves
THE HERO WITH A
T H O U S A N D FACES
Commemorative Edition, with an Introduction
by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, Ph.D.
Joseph Campbell’s classic crosscultural study of the hero’s journey
has inspired millions and opened up
new areas of research and exploration.
Originally published in 1949, the
book hit the New York Times best­
seller list in 1988 when it became the
subject of The Power of Myth, a PBS
television special. Now, this legend­
ary volume, re-released in honor of
the 100th anniversary of the author’s
birth, promises to capture the imagi­
nation of a new generation of readers.
The first popular work to com­
bine the spiritual and psychological
insights of modern psychoanalysis
with the archetypes of world mythol­
ogy, the book creates a roadmap for
navigating the frustrating path of
contemporary life. Examining heroic
myths in the light of modern psychol­
ogy, it considers not only the patterns
and stages of mythology but also its
relevance to our lives today—and to
(continued on back flap)
I
the life of any person seeking a fully
realized existence.
Myth, according to Campbell, is the
projection of a culture’s dreams onto
a large screen; Campbell’s book, like
Star Wars, the film it helped inspire,
is an exploration of the big-picture
moments from the stage that is our
world. Offered for the first time with
beautifully restored illustrations and
a bibliography of cited works, it pro­
vides unparalleled insight into world,
mythology from diverse cultures. It is
a must-have resource for both experi­
enced students of mythology and the
explorer just beginning to approach
myth as a source of knowledge.
JOSEPH CAMPBELL ( 1 9 0 4 ^ 1 9 8 7 )
was
an inspiring teacher, popular lec­
turer and author, and the editor and
translator of many books on mythol­
ogy, including The Mythic Image
(Princeton/Bollingen Paperbacks).
CLARISSA PINKOLA E S T E S is the
au­
thor of the national bestseller Women
Who Run with the Wolves.
To receive emails about new books
in your area of interest, sign up at
pup.princeton.edu
A PRINCETON
CLASSIC
EDITION
THE HERO WITH A
THOUSAND FACES
“I have returned to no book more often since leaving college
than this one, and every time I discover new insight into the hu­
man journey. Every generation will find in Hero wisdom for the
ages.”
— B I L L MOYERS, host of the PBS television series
NOW with BUI Moyen
“In the three decades since I discovered The Hero with a Thou­
sand Faces, it has continued to fascinate and inspire me. Joseph
Campbell peers through centuries and shows us that we are all
connected by a basic need to hear stories and understand our­
selves. As a book, it is wonderful to read; as illumination into the
human condition, it is a revelation.
—George Lucas, filmmaker, creator of Star Wan
“Campbell’s words carry extraordinary weight, not ojjjv amo*£
scholars but among a wide range of other people who fiad h$*
search down mythological pathways relevant to their lives today*
. . . The book for which he is most famous, The Hero with a
Thousand Faces [is] a brilliant examination, through ancient
hero myths, of man’s eternal struggle for identity.”—TlrtK
Jacket design by Frank Mahood
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS
BOLLINGEN
SERIES
XVII
THE HERO W I T H A
THOUSAND
FACES
JOSEPH CAMPBELL
BOLLINGEN
PRINCETON
SERIES
UNIVERSITY
PRINCETON
AND
XVII
PRESS
OXFORD
Copyright
Published
© 2004 by Princeton
by Princeton
University
New Jersey 08540;
Press
Street,
original edition was copyright
Bollingen Foundation,
edition (with revisions)
University
Press, 41 William
and published
copyright
by Pantheon Books;
© 1968 by Princeton
Princeton,
© 1949 by
second
University
Press
All rights reserved
T H I S V O L U M E IS T H E S E V E N T E E N T H IN A SERIES OF BOOKS
S P O N S O R E D BY BOLLINGEN FOUNDATION
First Edition,
Second Edition,
Commemorative
1949
1968
Edition,
2004
T h e Introduction to the 2 0 0 4 edition is copyright © 2 0 0 3 Clarissa Pinkola
Estes, P h . D . All rights reserved
Library
of Congress Control No.
2003066084
I S B N : 0-691-11924-4
T h i s book has been composed in
Princeton University Press Digital Monticello
Printed on acid-free paper. »
www.pupress.princeton.edu
Printed in the U n i t e d States of America
1 3 5 7 9
10
8 6 4 2
TO MT
FATHER
AND
MOTHER
TABLE OF CONTENTS
List of Figures
xi
List of Plates
xvi
Preface to the 1949 Edition
xxi
Introduction to the 2004 Commemorative
by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, Ph.D.
Edition,
Acknowledgments
lxvi
P R O L O G U E : T h e Monomyth
1.
2.
3.
4.
xxiii
1
Myth and Dream
Tragedy and Comedy
The Hero and the God
The World Navel
3
23
28
37
PART ONE
T h e A d v e n t u r e of t h e H e r o
CHAPTER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
I: Departure
45
The Call to Adventure
Refusal of the Call
Supernatural Aid
The Crossing of the First Threshold
The Belly of the Whale
II: Initiation
1. The Road of Trials
2. The Meeting with the Goddess
3. Woman as the Temptress
CHAPTER
vii
45
54
63
71
83
89
89
100
111
CONTENTS
4. Atonement with the Father
5. Apotheosis
6. The Ultimate Boon
III: Return
Refusal of the Return
The Magic Flight
Rescue from Without
The Crossing of the Return Threshold
Master of the Two Worlds
Freedom to Live
CHAPTER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
CHAPTER
IV: T h e Keys
PART TWO
T h e C o s m o g o n i e Cycle
CHAPTER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
I: Emanations
From Psychology to Metaphysics
The Universal Round
Out of the Void-Space
Within Space—Life
The Breaking of the One into the Manifold
Folk Stories of Creation
II: T h e Virgin Birth
Mother Universe
Matrix of Destiny
Womb of Redemption
Folk Stories of Virgin Motherhood
CHAPTER
1.
2.
3.
4.
III: Transformations of the Hero
The Primordial Hero and the Human
Childhood of the Human Hero
The Hero as Warrior
The Hero as Lover
The Hero as Emperor and as Tyrant
The Hero as World Redeemer
CHAPTER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
viii
CONTENTS
7. The Hero as Saint
8. Departure of the Hero
327
329
CHAPTER I V :
Dissolutions
1. End of the Microcosm
2. End of the Macrocosm
337
337
345
E P I L O G U E : Myth and Society
1. The Shapeshifter
2. The Function of Myth, Cult, and Meditation
3. The Hero Today
351
353
354
358
Bibliography
363
Index
383
ix
LIST OF FIGURES
Sileni and Maenads. From a black-figure amphora,
ca. 4 5 0 – 5 0 0 B.C., found in a grave at Gela, Sicily.
(Monumenti Antichi, pubblicati per cura della
Reale Accademia dei Lincei, Vol. XVII, Milan,
1907, Plate XXXVII.)
Minotauromachy.
From an Attic red-figure crater,
5th cent. B.C. Here Theseus kills the Minotaur
with a short sword; this is the usual version in the
vase paintings. In the written accounts the hero
uses his bare hands. (Collection des vases grecs de
M. le Comte de Lamberg, expliquée et publiée par
Alexandre de la Borde, Paris, 1813, Plate XXX.)
Osiris in the Form of a Bull Transports His Worshiper
to the Underworld. From an Egyptian coffin in the
British Museum. (E. A. Wallis Budge, Osiris and
the Egyptian Resurrection,
London, Philip Lee
Warner; N e w York, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911,
Vol. I, p. 13.)
Ulysses and the Sirens. From an Attic polychromefigured white lecythus, 5th cent, B.C., now in the
Central Museum, Athens. (Eugénie Sellers,
“Three Attic Lekythoi from Eretria,” Journal of
Hellenic Studies, Vol. XIII, 1892, Plate I.)
The Night-Sea Journey:—Joseph in the Well: Entomb­
ment of Christ: Jonah and the Whale. A page from
the fifteenth-century Biblia Pauperum,
German
edition, 1471, showing Old Testament prefigurements of the history of Jesus. Compare Figures 8
and 11. (Edition of the Weimar Gesellschaft der
Bibliophilen, 1906.)
xi
L I S T OF
FIGURES
6. Isis in the Form of a Hawk Joins Osiris in the Under­
world. This is the moment of the conception of
Horus, who is to play an important role in the res­
urrection of his father. (Compare Fig. 10.) From a
series of bas-reliefs on the walls of the temple of
Osiris at Dendera, illustrating the mysteries per­
formed annually in that city in honor of the god.
(E. A. Wallis Budge, Osiris and the Egyptian
Resurrection, London, Philip Lee Warner; N e w
York, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911, Vol. II, p. 28.)
7. Isis Giving Bread and Water to the Soul. (E. A.
Wallis Budge, Osiris and the Egyptian
Resurrec­
tion, London, Philip Lee Warner; N e w York,
G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911, Vol. II, p. 134.)
8. The Conquest of the Monster:—David
The Harrowing
of Hell: Samson
(Same source as Fig. 5.)
and Goliath:
and the Lion.
9a. Gorgon-Sister Pursuing Perseus, Who Is Fleeing with
the Head of Medusa. Perseus, armed with a scimi­
tar bestowed on him by Hermes, approached the
three Gorgons while they slept, cut off the head of
Medusa, put it in his wallet, and fled on the wings
of his magic sandals. In the literary versions, the
hero departs undiscovered, thanks to a cap of in­
visibility; here, however, we see one of the two
surviving Gorgon-Sisters in pursuit. From a redfigure amphora of the 5th cent. B.C. in the collec­
tion of the Munich Antiquarium. (Adolf Furtwàngler, Friedrich Hauser, and Karl Reichhold,
Griechische Vasenmalerei, Munich, F. Bruckmann,
1 9 0 4 – 1 9 3 2 , Plate 134.)
9b. Perseus Fleeing with the Head of Medusa in His
Wallet. This figure and the one above appear on
opposite sides of the same amphora. The effect of
the arrangement is amusing and lively. (See
xii
L I S T OF
FIGURES
Furtwàngler, Hauser, and Reichhold, op.
Série III, Text, p. 77, Fig. 39.)
cit.,
188
10. The Resurrection of Osiris. T h e god rises from the
egg; Isis (the Hawk of Fig. 6) protects it with her
wing. Horus (the son conceived in the Sacred Mar­
riage of Fig. 6) holds the Ankh, or sign of life,
before his father’s face. From a bas-relief at Philae.
(E. A. Wallis Budge, Osiris and the Egyptian Res­
urrection, London, Philip Lee Warner; N e w York,
G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911, Vol. II, p. 58.)
194
11. The Reappearance of the Hero:—Samson
with the
Temple-Doors: Christ Arisen: Jonah. (Same source
as Fig. 5.)
203
12. The Return of Jason. This is a view of Jason’s adven­
ture not represented in the literary tradition. “The
vase-painter seems to have remembered in some
odd haunting way that the dragon-slayer is of the
dragon’s seed. He is being born anew from his
jaws” (Jane Harrison, Themis, A Study of the Social
Origins of Greek Religion, Cambridge University
Press, second edition, 1927, p. 435). The Golden
Fleece is hanging on the tree. Athena, patroness of
heroes, is in attendance with her owl. Note the
Gorgoneum on her Aegis (compare Plate XXII).
(From a vase in the Vatican Etruscan Collection.
After a photo by D . Anderson, Rome.)
229
13. Tuamotuan
Creation Chart:—Below:
The Cosmic
Egg. Above: The People Appear, and Shape the Uni­
verse. (Kenneth P. Emory, “The Tuamotuan Cre­
ation Charts by Paiore,” Journal of the Polynesian
Society, Vol. 4 8 , N o . 1, p. 3.)
256
14. The Separation of Sky and Earth. A common figure
on Egyptian coffins and papyri. T h e god ShuHeka separates N u t and Seb. This is the moment
of the creation of the world. (F. Max Muller,
xiii
L I S T OF
FIGURES
Egyptian Mythology, T h e Mythology of All Races,
Vol. XII, Boston, Marshall Jones Company,
1918, p. 4 4 . )
263
15. Khnemu Shapes Pharaoh’s Son on the Potter’s Wheel,
While Thoth Marks His Span of Life. From a pa­
pyrus of the Ptolemaic period. (E. A. Wallis Budge,
The Gods of the Egyptians, London, Methuen and
Co., 1904, Vol. II, p. 50.)
270
16. Nut (the Sky) Gives Birth to the Sun; Its Rays Fall on
Hathor in the Horizon (Love and Life). The sphere
at the mouth of the goddess represents the sun at
evening, about to be swallowed and born anew.
(E. A. Wallis Budge, The Gods of the Egyptians,
London, Methuen and Co., 1904, Vol. I, p. 101.)
276
17. Paleolithic Petroglyph (Algiers). From a prehistoric
site in the neighborhood of Tiout. T h e catlike ani­
mal between the hunter and the ostrich is perhaps
some variety of trained hunting panther, and the
horned beast left behind with the hunter’s mother,
a domesticated animal at pasture. (Leo Frobenius
and Hugo Obermaier, Hâdschra Mâktuba, Munich,
K. Wolff, 1925, Vol. II, Plate 78.)
310
18. King Ten (Egypt, First Dynasty,
ca. 3200
B.c.)
Smashes the Head of a Prisoner of War. From an
ivory plaque found at Abydos. “Immediately be­
hind the captive is a standard surmounted by a
figure of a jackal, which represents a god, either
Anubis or Apuat, and thus it is clear that the
sacrifice is being made to a god by the king.”
(E. A. Wallis Budge, Osiris and the Egyptian Res­
urrection, London, Philip Lee Warner; N e w York,
G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911, Vol. I, p. 197; line cut,
p. 207.)
315
19. Osiris, Judge of the Dead. Behind the god stand the
goddesses Isis and Nephthys. Before him is a
lotus, or lily, supporting his grandchildren, the
xiv
L I S T OF
FIGURES
four sons of Horus. Beneath (or beside) him is a
lake of sacred water, the divine source of the Nile
upon earth (the ultimate origin of which is in
heaven). T h e god holds in his left hand the flail or
whip, and in his right the crook. T h e cornice
above is ornamented with a row of twenty-eight
sacred uraei, each of which supports a disk.—
From the Papyrus of Hunefer. (E. A. Wallis Budge,
Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection,
London,.
Philip Lee Warner; N e w York, G. P. Putnam’s
Sons, 1911, Vol. I, p. 20.)
341
2 0 . The Serpent Kheti in the Underworld,
Consuming
with Fire an Enemy of Osiris. T h e arms of the vic­
tim are tied behind him. Seven gods preside. This
is a detail from a scene representing an area of the
Underworld traversed by the Solar Boat in the
eighth hour of the night.—From the so-called
“Book of Pylons.” (E. A. Wallis Budge, The Gods
of the Egyptians, London, Methuen and Co., 1904,
Vol. I, p. 193.)
342
21. The Doubles of Ani and His Wife Drinking Water in
the Other World. From the Papyrus of Ani. (E. A.
Wallis Budge, Osiris and the Egyptian
Resurrec­
tion, London, Philip Lee Warner; N e w York,
G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911, Vol. II, p. 130.)
344
xv
LIST OF PLATES
FOLLOWING
PAGE
84
I. The Monster Tamer (Sumer). Shell inlay (perhaps orna­
menting a harp) from a royal tomb at Ur, ca. 3 2 0 0 B . c .
T h e central figure is probably Gilgamesh. (Courtesy of
T h e University Museum, Philadelphia.)
II. The Captive Unicorn (France). Detail from tapestry, “The
Hunt of the Unicorn,” probably made for Francis I of
France, ca. 1514 A.D. (Courtesy of The Metropolitan Mu­
seum of Art, N e w York City.)
III. The Mother of the Gods (Nigeria). Odudua, with the infant
Ogun, god of war and iron, on her knee. The dog is sa­
cred to Ogun. An attendant, of human stature, plays the
drum. Painted wood. Lagos, Nigeria. Egba-Yoruba tribe.
(Horniman Museum, London. Photo from Michael E.
Sadler, Arts of West Africa, International Institute of
African Languages and Cultures, Oxford Press, London:
Humphrey Milford, 1935.)
IV. The Deity in War Dress (Bali). The Lord Krishna in his terrify­
ing manifestation. (Compare infra, pp. 215-220.) Poly­
chromatic wooden statue. (Photo from C. M. Pleyte,
Indonesian Art, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1901.)
V. Sekhmet, The Goddess (Egypt). Diorite statue. Empire Pe­
riod. Karnak. (Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of
Art, N e w York City.)
VI. Medusa (Ancient Rome). Marble, high relief; from the Rondanini Palace, Rome. Date uncertain. (Collection of
the Glyptothek, Munich. Photo from H. Brunn and
F. Bruckmann, Denkmàler griechischer und rômischer
Sculptur, Verlagsan-stalt fur Kunst und Wissenschaft,
Munich, 1 8 8 8 – 1 9 3 2 . )
xvi
L I S T OF
PLATES
VII. The Sorcerer (Paleolithic Cave Painting, French Pyrenees).
The earliest known portrait of a medicine man, ca. 10,000
B.C. Rock engraving with black paint fill-in, 29.5 inches
high, dominating a series of several hundred mural engravings of animals; in the Aurignacian-Magdalenian
cave known as the “Trois Frères,” Ariège, France. (From
a photo by the discoverer, Count Bégouen.)
VIII. The Universal Father, Viracocha, Weeping
(Argen-tina).
Plaque found at Andalgalâ, Catamarca, in northwest
Argentina, tentatively identified as the pre-Incan deity
Viracocha. The head is surmounted by the rayed solar
disk, the hands hold thunderbolts, tears descend from
the eyes. The creatures at the shoulders are perhaps
Imaymana and Tacapu, the two sons and messengers of
Viracocha, in animal form. (Photo from the Proceedings
of the International Congress of Americanists, Vol. XII,
Paris, 1902.)
FOLLOWING
PAGE
180
IX. Shiva, Lord of the Cosmic Dance (South India). See discussion, infra, p. 118, note 4 6 . Bronze, 10th-12th cent A . D .
(Madras Museum. Photo from Auguste Rodin, Ananda
Coomaraswamy, E. B. Havell, Victor Goloubeu, Sculptures Çivaïtes de Vlnde, Ars Asiatica III, Brussels and
Paris: G. van Oest et Cie., 1921.)
X. Androgynous Ancestor (Sudan). W o o d carving from the region of Bandiagara, French Sudan. (Collection of Laura
Harden, N e w York City. Photo by Walker Evans, courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, N e w York City.)
XI. Bodhisattva (China). Kwan Yin. Painted wood. Late Sung
Dynasty ( 9 6 0 – 1 2 7 9 A.D.). (Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, N e w York City).
XII. Bodhisattva (Tibet). The Bodhisattva known as Ushnïshasitâtapatrâ, surrounded by Buddhas and Bodhisattvas,
xvii
L I S T OF
PLATES
and having one hundred and seventeen heads, symboliz­
ing her influence in the various spheres of being. The left
hand holds the World Umbrella (axis mundi) and the
right the Wheel of the Law. Beneath the numerous
blessed feet of the Bodhisattva stand the people of the
world who have prayed for Enlightenment, while be­
neath the feet of the three “furious” powers at the bottom
of the picture lie those still tortured by lust, resentment,
and delusion. The sun and moon in the upper corners
symbolize the miracle of the marriage, or identity, of
eternity and time, Nirvana and the world (see pp. 156157 ff.). The lamas at the top center represent the ortho­
dox line of Tibetan teachers of the doctrine symbolized
in this religious banner-painting. (Courtesy of The
American Museum of Natural History, N e w York City.)
XIII. The Branch of Immortal Life (Assyria). Winged being offer­
ing a branch with pomegranates. Alabaster wall panel
from the Palace of Ashur-nasir-apal II ( 8 8 5 – 8 6 0 B . C . ) ,
King of Assyria, at Kalhu (modern Nimrud). (Courtesy
of T h e Metropolitan Museum of Art, N e w York City.)
XIV. Bodhisattva
(Cambodia).
Fragment from the ruins of
Angkor. 12th cent. A . D . The Buddha figure crowning
the head is a characteristic sign of the Bodhisattva
(compare Plates XI and XII; in the latter the Buddha
figure sits atop the pyramid of heads). (Musée Guimet,
Paris. Photo from Angkor, éditions “Tel,” Paris, 1935.)
XV. The Return (Ancient Rome). Marble relief found (1887)
in a piece of ground formerly belonging to the Villa
Ludovisi. Perhaps of early Greek workmanship.
(Museo délie Terme, Rome. Photo Antike Denkmàler,
herausgegeben vom Kaiserlich Deutschen Archaeologischen Institut, Berlin: Georg Reimer, Vol. II, 1908.)
XVI. The Cosmic Lion Goddess, Holding the Sun (North India).
From a seventeenth- or eighteenth-century single-leaf
manuscript, from Delhi. (Courtesy of The Pierpont
Morgan Library, N e w York City.)
xviii
L I S T OF
FOLLOWING
PLATES
PAGE
308
XVII. The Fountain of Life (Flanders). Central panel of a trip­
tych by Jean Bellegambe (of Douai), ca. 1520. T h e
assisting female figure at the right, with the little
galleon on her head, is Hope; the corresponding figure
at the left, Love. (Courtesy of the Palais des BeauxArts, Lille.)
XVIII. The Moon King and His People (South Rhodesia). Prehis­
toric rock painting, at Diana V o w Farm, Rusapi Dis­
trict, South Rhodesia, perhaps …
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