Security engineering discussion PART A Now that you have started to read the book and think about infosec, possibly in a different way than before, think

Security engineering discussion PART A

Now that you have started to read the book and think about infosec, possibly in a different way than before, think about the following questions…

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In your everyday environment (at work, out shopping, in a public place, etc.), have you ever noticed something insecure? And if so, what? In other words, have you seen something (anything) where you just said to yourself, “A person could exploit that in about five seconds and cause some real problems”? What would/did you do?

“I am not asking this so that you can take potshots. I live life as a professional paranoid (although I try not to let that creep into my personal life!), looking for ways in which I can exploit systems. That’s part of what you will need to do, as well…. in order to secure a system, you need to think *not* like a defender, but like an attacker… and there is always a weakest link.” ~ comment from Course Developer

Discuss and interact regularly with your classmates, bringing the discussion to a close by the end of Week 2.

PART B (respond to following discussion)

1.The first thing that comes to mind when I think about infosec is the whole life insurance policy I bought last Tuesday. The agent came into my home, pulled out her tablet, connected to the internet through her personal hotspot. I took immediate notice of this and asked if she needed to connect to my connection. I then proceeded to ask her what kind of controls are used to protect my data, my social security number, my income, full address and my beneficiary’s social security number are now on her tablet connected to a hot spot from her phone. She was not able to provide me an answer. She said she really had no idea what kind of procedures were in place. She also stated that she almost never connects to anyone’s in home Wi-Fi, or places that offer such as Starbucks. This young lady is a product of the information generation, she has the world at her fingertips. I bet she thinks about how to protect customers PII now. In addition to our credit being vulnerable if their systems are hacked, there could also be HIPPA violations as you know, there are a lot of health questions involved when purchasing life insurance.

Another thought while reading the first chapter of the text, who guards the planes overnight! Never crossed my mind until I read that in the book and now just another stressful thought when entering an airport. I especially like the eye opening in the first chapter discussing the bank, military base and hospital. Many people enter hospitals everyday for various reasons. We trust the staffs inside to heal us and our loved ones. In early 2003, I went through a very life saving surgery where an entire organ was removed. I was young and very much interested in the medical of it all. I asked if I could have the organ, you know in a sealed jar. They said no, it is going to research at the University of Florida. I never questioned another thing about it. After reading the hospital section of chapter one, I now wonder if my privacy was ever violated. If my name and information was somehow not encrypted on the files and specimens.

2. There are multiple examples of security flaws that I have seen- data breaches, PII passed unencrypted, computer screens being left unlocked, long & less secure password requirements etc. However, the first one that came to mind was supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. Concerns the security of these critical infrastructure systems has been around for years, however not much progress has been made. In fact, SCADA systems are becoming more vulnerable as more of these systems use commercial IoT technology and cloud-computing services and an attack could lead to disastrous effects on the public (Do, 2017). For instance, back in 2008, a teenager in Poland derailed four trams after hacking into SCADA equipment using a modified television remote control (McCarthy, 2013). These threats could be mitigated by using a combination physical and software security measures to provide authentication and accountability (Al Hamadi, Yeun, & Zemerly, 2013) or through SSL/TLS methods (Patel, 2008).

Another example is how the U.S. uses credit card chips. On a recent trip to New Zealand, I noticed that whenever I used a card with a chip reader, I had to sign the receipt, which confused the local vendors. Turns out in their country, they use the more secure Chip-and-Pin option instead of Chip-and-Signature because anyone can forge a signature, and most cashiers do not verify if your signature matches the one on the card (Harkness, 2018).

References

Al Hamadi, H. M., Yeun, C. Y., & Zemerly, M. J. (2013). A Novel Security Scheme for the Smart Grid and SCADA Networks. Wireless Personal Communications, 73(4), 1547-1559. doi:10.1007/s11277-013-1265-y

Do, V. L. (2017). Security of SCADA systems against cyber–physical attacks. IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, 32(5), 28-45. doi:10.1109/MAES.2017.160047

Harkness, B. (2018, August 08). Chip Credit Cards: EMV, Chip-and-PIN, and Chip-and-Signature. Retrieved from Credit Card Insider: https://www.creditcardinsider.com/learn/chip-and-s…

McCarthy, J. &. (2013). SCADA threats in the modern airport. International Journal of Cyber Warfare and Terrorism (IJCWT), 3(4), 32-39. Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.libproxy.db.er…

Patel, S. C. (2008). Securing SCADA systems. Information Management & Computer Security, 16(4). Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.libproxy.db.er… Security Engineering
A Guide to Building
Dependable Distributed
Systems
Second Edition
Ross J. Anderson
Wiley Publishing, Inc.
Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems,
Second Edition
Published by
Wiley Publishing, Inc.
10475 Crosspoint Boulevard
Indianapolis, IN 46256
Copyright © 2008 by Ross J. Anderson. All Rights Reserved.
Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published simultaneously in Canada
ISBN: 978-0-470-06852-6
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Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Anderson, Ross, 1956Security engineering : a guide to building dependable distributed systems / Ross J Anderson. — 2nd ed.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-470-06852-6 (cloth)
1. Computer security. 2. Electronic data processing–Distributed processing. I. Title.
QA76.9.A25A54 2008
005.1–dc22
2008006392
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& Sons, Inc. and/or its af?liates, in the United States and other countries, and may not be used without written
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To Shireen
Credits
Executive Editor
Carol Long
Senior Development
Editor
Tom Dinse
Production Editor
Tim Tate
Editorial Manager
Mary Beth Wake?eld
Production Manager
Tim Tate
Vice President
and Executive Group
Publisher
Richard Swadley
Vice President
and Executive
Publisher
Joseph B. Wikert
Project Coordinator,
Cover
Lynsey Stanford
Proofreader
Nancy Bell
Indexer
Jack Lewis
Cover Image
© Digital Vision/Getty Images
Cover Design
Michael E. Trent
v
Contents at a Glance
Preface to the Second Edition
xxv
Foreword by Bruce Schneier
xxvii
Preface
xxix
Acknowledgments
xxxv
Part I
Chapter 1
What Is Security Engineering?
3
Chapter 2
Usability and Psychology
17
Chapter 3
Protocols
63
Chapter 4
Access Control
93
Chapter 5
Cryptography
129
Chapter 6
Distributed Systems
185
Chapter 7
Economics
215
Chapter 8
Multilevel Security
239
Chapter 9
Multilateral Security
275
Part II
Chapter 10 Banking and Bookkeeping
313
Chapter 11 Physical Protection
365
Chapter 12 Monitoring and Metering
389
Chapter 13 Nuclear Command and Control
415
vii
viii
Contents at a Glance
Chapter 14 Security Printing and Seals
433
Chapter 15 Biometrics
457
Chapter 16 Physical Tamper Resistance
483
Chapter 17 Emission Security
523
Chapter 18 API Attacks
547
Chapter 19 Electronic and Information Warfare
559
Chapter 20 Telecom System Security
595
Chapter 21 Network Attack and Defense
633
Chapter 22 Copyright and DRM
679
Chapter 23 The Bleeding Edge
727
Part III
Chapter 24 Terror, Justice and Freedom
769
Chapter 25 Managing the Development of Secure Systems
815
Chapter 26 System Evaluation and Assurance
857
Chapter 27 Conclusions
889
Bibliography
893
Index
997
Contents
Preface to the Second Edition
xxv
Foreword by Bruce Schneier
xxvii
Preface
xxix
Acknowledgments
xxxv
Part I
Chapter 1
What Is Security Engineering?
Introduction
A Framework
Example 1–A Bank
Example 2–A Military Base
Example 3–A Hospital
Example 4–The Home
De?nitions
Summary
3
3
4
6
7
9
10
11
15
Chapter 2
Usability and Psychology
Introduction
Attacks Based on Psychology
Pretexting
Phishing
Insights from Psychology Research
What the Brain Does Worse Than the Computer
Perceptual Bias and Behavioural Economics
Different Aspects of Mental Processing
Differences Between People
Social Psychology
What the Brain Does Better Than Computer
17
17
18
19
21
22
23
24
26
27
28
30
ix
x
Contents
Chapter 3
Passwords
Dif?culties with Reliable Password Entry
Dif?culties with Remembering the Password
Naive Password Choice
User Abilities and Training
Design Errors
Operational Issues
Social-Engineering Attacks
Trusted Path
Phishing Countermeasures
Password Manglers
Client Certs or Specialist Apps
Using the Browser’s Password Database
Soft Keyboards
Customer Education
Microsoft Passport
Phishing Alert Toolbars
Two-Factor Authentication
Trusted Computing
Forti?ed Password Protocols
Two-Channel Authentication
The Future of Phishing
System Issues
Can You Deny Service?
Protecting Oneself or Others?
Attacks on Password Entry
Interface Design
Eavesdropping
Technical Defeats of Password Retry Counters
Attacks on Password Storage
One-Way Encryption
Password Cracking
Absolute Limits
CAPTCHAs
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
31
32
33
34
35
37
39
40
42
43
43
44
44
45
45
46
47
47
48
49
49
50
52
53
53
54
54
55
55
56
56
57
57
59
60
61
61
Protocols
Introduction
Password Eavesdropping Risks
Who Goes There? — Simple Authentication
Challenge and Response
The MIG-in-the-Middle Attack
Re?ection Attacks
Manipulating the Message
Changing the Environment
63
63
65
66
70
73
76
78
79
Contents
Chosen Protocol Attacks
Managing Encryption Keys
Basic Key Management
The Needham-Schroeder Protocol
Kerberos
Practical Key Management
Getting Formal
A Typical Smartcard Banking Protocol
The BAN Logic
Verifying the Payment Protocol
Limitations of Formal Veri?cation
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
Chapter 4
Access Control
Introduction
Operating System Access Controls
Groups and Roles
Access Control Lists
Unix Operating System Security
Apple’s OS/X
Windows — Basic Architecture
Capabilities
Windows — Added Features
Middleware
Database Access Controls
General Middleware Issues
ORBs and Policy Languages
Sandboxing and Proof-Carrying Code
Virtualization
Trusted Computing
Hardware Protection
Intel Processors, and ‘Trusted Computing’
ARM Processors
Security Processors
What Goes Wrong
Smashing the Stack
Other Technical Attacks
User Interface Failures
Why So Many Things Go Wrong
Remedies
Environmental Creep
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
80
82
83
84
85
86
87
87
88
89
90
91
92
92
93
93
96
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
107
107
108
109
110
111
111
113
114
116
116
117
118
119
121
122
124
125
126
127
127
xi
xii
Contents
Chapter 5
Cryptography
Introduction
Historical Background
An Early Stream Cipher — The Vigene?re
The One-Time Pad
An Early Block Cipher — Playfair
One-Way Functions
Asymmetric Primitives
The Random Oracle Model
Random Functions — Hash Functions
Properties
The Birthday Theorem
Random Generators — Stream Ciphers
Random Permutations — Block Ciphers
Public Key Encryption and Trapdoor One-Way Permutations
Digital Signatures
Symmetric Crypto Primitives
SP-Networks
Block Size
Number of Rounds
Choice of S-Boxes
Linear Cryptanalysis
Differential Cryptanalysis
Serpent
The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)
Feistel Ciphers
The Luby-Rackoff Result
DES
Modes of Operation
Electronic Code Book
Cipher Block Chaining
Output Feedback
Counter Encryption
Cipher Feedback
Message Authentication Code
Composite Modes of Operation
Hash Functions
Extra Requirements on the Underlying Cipher
Common Hash Functions and Applications
Asymmetric Crypto Primitives
Cryptography Based on Factoring
Cryptography Based on Discrete Logarithms
Public Key Encryption — Dif?e Hellman and ElGamal
Key Establishment
Digital Signature
Special Purpose Primitives
129
129
130
131
132
134
136
138
138
140
141
142
143
144
146
147
149
149
150
150
151
151
152
153
153
155
157
157
160
160
161
161
162
163
163
164
165
166
167
170
170
173
174
175
176
178
Contents
Elliptic Curve Cryptography
Certi?cation
The Strength of Asymmetric Cryptographic Primitives
179
179
181
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
182
183
183
Chapter 6
Distributed Systems
Introduction
Concurrency
Using Old Data Versus Paying to Propagate State
Locking to Prevent Inconsistent Updates
The Order of Updates
Deadlock
Non-Convergent State
Secure Time
Fault Tolerance and Failure Recovery
Failure Models
Byzantine Failure
Interaction with Fault Tolerance
What Is Resilience For?
At What Level Is the Redundancy?
Service-Denial Attacks
Naming
The Distributed Systems View of Naming
What Else Goes Wrong
Naming and Identity
Cultural Assumptions
Semantic Content of Names
Uniqueness of Names
Stability of Names and Addresses
Adding Social Context to Naming
Restrictions on the Use of Names
Types of Name
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
185
185
186
186
188
188
189
190
191
192
193
193
194
195
197
198
200
200
204
204
206
207
207
208
209
210
211
211
212
213
Chapter 7
Economics
Introduction
Classical Economics
Monopoly
Public Goods
Information Economics
The Price of Information
The Value of Lock-In
Asymmetric Information
215
215
216
217
219
220
220
221
223
xiii
xiv
Contents
Game Theory
The Prisoners’ Dilemma
Evolutionary Games
The Economics of Security and Dependability
Weakest Link, or Sum of Efforts?
Managing the Patching Cycle
Why Is Windows So Insecure?
Economics of Privacy
Economics of DRM
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
223
225
226
228
229
229
230
232
233
234
235
235
Multilevel Security
Introduction
What Is a Security Policy Model?
The Bell-LaPadula Security Policy Model
Classi?cations and Clearances
Information Flow Control
The Standard Criticisms of Bell-LaPadula
Alternative Formulations
The Biba Model and Vista
Historical Examples of MLS Systems
SCOMP
Blacker
MLS Unix and Compartmented Mode Workstations
The NRL Pump
Logistics Systems
Sybard Suite
Wiretap Systems
Future MLS Systems
Vista
Linux
Virtualization
Embedded Systems
What Goes Wrong
Composability
The Cascade Problem
Covert Channels
The Threat from Viruses
Polyinstantiation
Other Practical Problems
Broader Implications of MLS
239
239
240
242
243
245
246
248
250
252
252
253
253
254
255
256
256
257
257
258
260
261
261
261
262
263
265
266
267
269
Part II
Chapter 8
Contents
Chapter 9
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
272
272
272
Multilateral Security
Introduction
Compartmentation, the Chinese Wall and the BMA Model
Compartmentation and the Lattice Model
The Chinese Wall
The BMA Model
The Threat Model
The Security Policy
Pilot Implementations
Current Privacy Issues
Inference Control
Basic Problems of Inference Control in Medicine
Other Applications of Inference Control
The Theory of Inference Control
Query Set Size Control
Trackers
More Sophisticated Query Controls
Cell Suppression
Maximum Order Control and the Lattice Model
Audit Based Control
Randomization
Limitations of Generic Approaches
Active Attacks
The Value of Imperfect Protection
The Residual Problem
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
275
275
277
277
281
282
284
287
289
290
293
293
296
297
298
298
298
299
300
300
301
302
304
305
306
309
310
310
Chapter 10 Banking and Bookkeeping
Introduction
The Origins of Bookkeeping
Double-Entry Bookkeeping
A Telegraphic History of E-commerce
How Bank Computer Systems Work
The Clark-Wilson Security Policy Model
Designing Internal Controls
What Goes Wrong
Wholesale Payment Systems
SWIFT
What Goes Wrong
Automatic Teller Machines
ATM Basics
313
313
315
316
316
317
319
320
324
328
329
331
333
334
xv
xvi
Contents
What Goes Wrong
Incentives and Injustices
Credit Cards
Fraud
Forgery
Automatic Fraud Detection
The Economics of Fraud
Online Credit Card Fraud — the Hype and the Reality
Smartcard-Based Banking
EMV
Static Data Authentication
Dynamic Data Authentication
Combined Data Authentication
RFID
Home Banking and Money Laundering
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
337
341
343
344
345
346
347
348
350
351
352
356
356
357
358
361
362
363
Chapter 11 Physical Protection
Introduction
Threats and Barriers
Threat Model
Deterrence
Walls and Barriers
Mechanical Locks
Electronic Locks
Alarms
How not to Protect a Painting
Sensor Defeats
Feature Interactions
Attacks on Communications
Lessons Learned
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
365
365
366
367
368
370
372
376
378
379
380
382
383
386
387
388
388
Chapter 12 Monitoring and Metering
Introduction
Prepayment Meters
Utility Metering
How the System Works
What Goes Wrong
Taxi Meters, Tachographs and Truck Speed Limiters
The Tachograph
What Goes Wrong
How Most Tachograph Manipulation Is Done
389
389
390
392
393
395
397
398
399
400
Contents
Tampering with the Supply
Tampering with the Instrument
High-Tech Attacks
The Digital Tachograph Project
System Level Problems
Other Problems
The Resurrecting Duckling
Postage Meters
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
401
401
402
403
404
405
407
408
412
413
414
Chapter 13 Nuclear Command and Control
Introduction
The Evolution of Command and Control
The Kennedy Memorandum
Authorization, Environment, Intent
Unconditionally Secure Authentication
Shared Control Schemes
Tamper Resistance and PALs
Treaty Veri?cation
What Goes Wrong
Secrecy or Openness?
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
415
415
417
418
419
420
422
424
426
427
429
430
430
430
Chapter 14 Security Printing and Seals
Introduction
History
Security Printing
Threat Model
Security Printing Techniques
Packaging and Seals
Substrate Properties
The Problems of Glue
PIN Mailers
Systemic Vulnerabilities
Peculiarities of the Threat Model
Anti-Gundecking Measures
The Effect of Random Failure
Materials Control
Not Protecting the Right Things
The Cost and Nature of Inspection
Evaluation Methodology
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
433
433
434
435
436
437
443
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
451
453
454
454
455
xvii
xviii Contents
Chapter 15 Biometrics
Introduction
Handwritten Signatures
Face Recognition
Bertillonage
Fingerprints
Verifying Positive or Negative Identity Claims
Crime Scene Forensics
Iris Codes
Voice Recognition
Other Systems
What Goes Wrong
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
457
457
458
461
464
464
466
469
472
475
476
477
481
482
482
Chapter 16 Physical Tamper Resistance
Introduction
History
High-End Physically Secure Processors
Evaluation
Medium Security Processors
The iButton
The Dallas 5000 Series
FPGA Security, and the Clipper Chip
Smartcards and Microcontrollers
History
Architecture
Security Evolution
The State of the Art
Defense in Depth
Stop Loss
What Goes Wrong
The Trusted Interface Problem
Con?icts
The Lemons Market, Risk Dumping and Evaluation
Security-By-Obscurity
Interaction with Policy
Function Creep
So What Should One Protect?
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
483
483
485
486
492
494
494
495
496
499
500
501
501
512
513
513
514
514
515
516
517
517
518
518
520
520
520
Chapter 17 Emission Security
Introduction
History
523
523
524
Contents
Technical Surveillance and Countermeasures
Passive Attacks
Leakage Through Power and Signal Cables
Red/Black Separation
Timing Analysis
Power Analysis
Leakage Through RF Signals
Active Attacks
Tempest Viruses
Nonstop
Glitching
Differential Fault Analysis
Combination Attacks
Commercial Exploitation
Defenses
Optical, Acoustic and Thermal Side Channels
How Serious are Emsec Attacks?
Governments
Businesses
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
526
530
530
530
531
531
534
538
538
539
540
540
540
541
541
542
544
544
545
546
546
546
Chapter 18 API Attacks
Introduction
API Attacks on Security Modules
The XOR-To-Null-Key Attack
The Attack on the 4758
Multiparty Computation, and Differential Protocol Attacks
The EMV Attack
API Attacks on Operating Systems
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
547
547
548
549
551
552
553
554
555
557
557
Chapter 19 Electronic and Information Warfare
Introduction
Basics
Communications Systems
Signals Intelligence Techniques
Attacks on Communications
Protection Techniques
Frequency Hopping
DSSS
Burst Communications
Combining Covertness and Jam Resistance
Interaction Between Civil and Military Uses
559
559
560
561
563
565
567
568
569
570
571
572
xix
xx
Contents
Surveillance and Target Acquisition
Types of Radar
Jamming Techniques
Advanced Radars and Countermeasures
Other Sensors and Multisensor Issues
IFF Systems
Improvised Explosive Devices
Directed Energy Weapons
Information Warfare
De?nitions
Doctrine
Potentially Useful Lessons from Electronic Warfare
Differences Between E-war and I-war
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
574
574
575
577
578
579
582
584
586
587
588
589
591
592
592
593
Chapter 20 Telecom System Security
Introduction
Phone Phreaking
Attacks on Metering
Attacks on Signaling
Attacks on Switching and Con?guration
Insecure End Systems
Feature Interaction
Mobile Phones
Mobile Phone Cloning
GSM Security Mechanisms
Third Generation Mobiles — 3gpp
Platform Security
So Was Mobile Security a Success or a Failure?
VOIP
Security Economics of Telecomms
Frauds by Phone Companies
Billing Mechanisms
Summary
Research Problems
Further Reading
595
595
596
596
599
601
603
605
606
607
608
617
619
621
623
624
625
627
630
631
632
Chapter 21 Network Attack and Defense
Introduction
Vulnerabilities in Network Protocols
Attacks on Local Networks
Attacks Using Internet Protocols and Mechanisms
SYN Flooding
Smur?ng
Distributed Denial of Service Attacks
633
633
635
636
638
638
639
640
Contents
Spam
DNS Security and Pharming
Trojans, Viruses, Worms and Rootkits
Early History of Malicious Code
The Internet Worm
How Viruses and Worms Work
The History of Malware
Countermeasures
Defense Against Network Attack
Con?guration Management and Operational Security
Filtering: Firewalls, Spam Filters, Censorware and Wiretaps
Packet Filtering
Circuit Gateways
Application Relays
Ingress Versus Egress Filtering
Architecture
Intrusion Detection
Types of Intrusion Detection
General Limitations of Intrusion Detection
Speci?c Problems Detecting Network Attacks
Encryption
SSH
WiFi
Bluetooth
HomePlug
IPsec
TLS
PKI
Topology
Summary
Rese…
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Our team consists of carefully selected writers with in-depth expertise. Each writer in our team is selected based on their writing skills and experience. Each team member is able to provide plagiarism-free, authentic and high-quality content within a short turnaround time.

Free Unlimited Revisions

If you think we missed something, send your order for a free revision. You have 10 days to submit the order for review after you have received the final document. You can do this yourself after logging into your personal account or by contacting our support.

Prompt Delivery and 100% Assuarance

We understand you. Spending your hard earned money on a writing service is a big deal. It is a big investment and it is difficult to make the decision. That is why we support our claims with guarantees. We want you to be reassured as soon as you place your order. Here are our guarantees: Your deadlines are important to us. When ordering, please note that delivery will take place no later than the expiry date.

100% Originality & Confidentiality

Every paper we write for every order is 100% original. To support this, we would be happy to provide you with a plagiarism analysis report on request.We use several writing tools checks to ensure that all documents you receive are free from plagiarism. Our editors carefully review all quotations in the text. We also promise maximum confidentiality in all of our services.

24/7 Customer Support

We help students, business professionals and job seekers around the world in multiple time zones. We also understand that students often keep crazy schedules. No problem. We are there for you around the clock. If you need help at any time, please contact us. An agent is always available for you.

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How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

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Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.

Our Services

Our services are second to none. Every time you place an order, you get a personal and original paper of the highest quality.

Essays

Essay Writing Service

While a college paper is the most common order we receive, we want you to understand that we have college writers for virtually everything, including: High school and college essays Papers, book reviews, case studies, lab reports, tests All graduate level projects, including theses and dissertations Admissions and scholarship essays Resumes and CV’s Web content, copywriting, blogs, articles Business writing – reports, marketing material, white papers Research and data collection/analysis of any type.

Admissions

Any Kind of Essay Writing!

Whether you are a high school student struggling with writing five-paragraph essays, an undergraduate management student stressing over a research paper, or a graduate student in the middle of a thesis or dissertation, homeworkmarketpro.com has a writer for you. We can also provide admissions or scholarship essays, a resume or CV, as well as web content or articles. Writing an essay for college admission takes a certain kind of writer. They have to be knowledgeable about your subject and be able to grasp the purpose of the essay.

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Quality Check and Editing Support

Every paper is subject to a strict editorial and revision process. This is to ensure that your document is complete and accurate and that all of your instructions have been followed carefully including creating reference lists in the formats APA, Harvard, MLA, Chicago / Turabian.

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Prices and Discounts

We are happy to say that we offer some of the most competitive prices in this industry. Since many of our customers are students, job seekers and small entrepreneurs, we know that money is a problem. Therefore, you will find better prices with us compared to writing services of this calibre.